Thanksgiving can be a stoner’s bonanza, providing an acceptable (and patriotic!) excuse to eat until you can’t move. If you’re contributing a side to Thanksgiving dinner for friends who are so inclined, here are three recipes for sides with a bit of a kick. Keep the turkey traditional, though — some things are sacred.

“Baked” Butternut Squash Soup

Ingredients:

  • 2 ½ lb butternut squash, peeled, and cut into 1-inch cubes (see demo for peeling and slicing squash here)
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and cut into small chunks
  • 2 tbsp canna-oil
  • 7 tbsp cannabutter
  • 1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced into half-moons
  • 4 medium cloves garlic, thinly sliced or grated on a microplane
  • 4 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Salt and pepper
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • Pinch cinnamon
  • Pinch nutmeg

Equipment:

  • Baking sheets
  • Large saucepan
  • Standing blender or immersion blender
  • Mixing bowl
  1. Preheat oven to 450°. Toss squash and carrot with canna-oil and arrange on a large baking sheet, so that they cover the sheet in an even layer; you may need to use two sheets. Add to oven and roast for one hour, or until vegetables are well browned, flipping them halfway through to ensure even cooking.
  2. In a large saucepan, melt 2 tablespoons cannabutter over low heat. Add onion and increase heat to medium low. Saute, stirring occasionally, until onions are lightly caramelized, about 10 minutes. butternut squash soupAdd garlic and stir. Saute for another minute or so, until garlic is just fragrant and lightly browned without burning it.
  3. Remove the saucepan with the onions and garlic from heat, and add the roasted squash and carrots; scrape any browned bits of carrot or squash that may have stuck to the baking sheets to the saucepan as well. Add all 4 cups of stock, thyme sprigs, and bay leaf and return to medium-high heat. Bring the mixture to a steady boil, then lower it and simmer uncover until vegetables are very soft, about 10 minutes. Pull out thyme sprigs and bay leaf.

  1. Using a standing blender or immersion blender, blend the mixture until soup is totally smooth. Season to taste with salt and pepper. If using a standing blender, return soup to saucepan. If preferred, thin out the consistency of soup with a small amount of chicken stock or water, stirring to incorporate.
  2. In a small mixing bowl, whisk together heavy cream, cinnamon, nutmeg, and a pinch of salt.
  3. Ladle soup into serving bowls, spoon bits of heavy cream mixture into each, and serve immediately.

“Herbed” Stuffing

Ingredients:

  • 2 ½ lb (or 2 loaves) sliced white or soft Italian bread, cut with a bread knife into a ¾ inch dice.
  • 8 tbsp cannabutter
  • 1 ½ lb pork sausage, removed from casing (optional)
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 4 stalks celery, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced or grated on microplane
  • 2 tbsp minced fresh sage leaves or 2 tsp dried sage leaves
  • 4 cups chicken or vegetable broth, preferably homemade
  • 3 whole eggs
  • 1/4 cup minced parsley leaves
  • Salt and pepper

Equipment:

  • Baking sheets
  • Dutch oven or large stockpot
  • 9×13” baking dish
  • Aluminum foil
  1. Preheat oven to 275°. Spread cubed bread in an even layer on two baking sheets. Add to oven and bake until completely dried out, about 50 minutes, rotating trays and flipping bread cubes two to three times during baking. Remove from oven and cool. Increase oven heat to 350°.
  2. In Dutch oven, melt cannabutter over medium heat. Add sausage if using (if not using, skip to step #3) and mash into pieces with a wooden spoon as it sizzles. Cook, stirring frequently, until sausage is only lightly pink in a few places, about 8 minutes.
  3. Add onions, celery, garlic, Bread stuffing and sage and saute, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are softened, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and add 2 cups of the stock.
  4. Whisk remaining 2 cups of stock, eggs, and 3 tbsp parsley in a medium bowl until combined and smooth. Stirring the onion mixture constantly, slowly add the egg mixture. Add the dried-out bread cubes and gently mix together until all evenly mixed
  5. Transfer mixture to a greased or buttered 9×13 ”  baking dish and cover with foil. Bake for about 45 minutes, or until an instant thermometer inserted into the center reads 150°. Remove foil and continue baking until the top is golden brown and crisp, about 10 more minutes. Remove from oven, let cool for 5 minutes, sprinkle with remaining chopped parsley and serve.

Garlic “Smashed” Potatoes

Ingredients:

  • Olive oil
  • 5 lb Russet or Yukon gold potatoes, peeled, rinsed, and diced
  • 12 tbsp cannabutter, plus more for scattering
  • ¼ cup half-and-half
  • Dash of heavy cream
  • Salt and pepper
  • 3 heads garlic

Equipment:

  • Tinfoil
  • Saucepan
  • Potato masher or fork
  • Large mixing bowl
  • 9 x 13” baking dish
  1. Preheat oven to 400°. Peel away the thick papery outer layers on the heads of garlic. It’s alright if some husk remains. Laying each head on its side, trim off ¼ inch from the top. Drizzle oil over the cut tops of the heads of garlic. Wrap each head in tinfoil; add to oven and roast for 40 minutes. Remove each head from the oven, unwrap, and let cool for 10 minutes. Once cool enough to handle, light squeeze roasted garlic cloves out of their husks.
  2. Reduce the oven temperature to 350°. Put the diced potatoes in a saucepan of water and bring to a rapid boil; lower to a simmer for 25 to 30 minutes until potatoes Mashed Potatoes are tender enough to be pierced with a fork. Drain and then mash the potatoeswith a potato masher or with the back of a fork in a large mixing bowl. Allow mashed-up potatoes to cool until all steam has escaped.
  3. Add the cannnabutter, half-and-half, cream, roasted garlic, and salt and pepper to taste. Stir and mash to combine, adjusting seasonings as needed.
  4. Pour the potatoes into a large, buttered 9 x 13 “ baking dish and spread evenly. Scatter a few pats of cannabutter over the top. Bake until warmed through, about 30 minutes. Potatoes can be mashed and seasoned one day ahead of time and baked the next day for your edible Thanksgiving day feast. 
Vincent Ballantine

About the author: Vincent Ballantine is a Brooklyn-based writer. A native New Yorker, he holds a degree in English from Georgetown University and has written on television, pop culture, travel, and health.